Accessibility

Accessibility is about making our online information available to as many people as possible, whatever their needs.

Our approach to accessibility

We aim for our website to meet the World Wide Web Consortium Accessibility Guidelines (version two) "Double-A" standard.

This is currently the recommended minimum standard for council websites.

Our site has been designed with this in mind and we ask all contributors to our website to use our Digital Design Manual in order to try to make content as accessible as possible.

Exceptions

We are aware that some areas of our website don't meet the standard of accessibility we aim for generally.

These are usually the applications accessed from our web pages and we are working with suppliers to try and improve the accessibility standard in these areas.

If you have difficulty accessing any area of our website please let us know.

Research, testing and improving our website

Our approach to creating and maintaining our website is to put customers at the heart of what we do and develop content and systems which meet their needs. 

This means we do research with real customers, with services and using available data before creating information and then test in a similar way as we build it and after it is in full use. 

You can get involved in testing our online services through signing up to our Digital First emailme list and looking out for opportunities. You can also complete the survey on our site to feedback about your visit. 

Accessibility – how we help everyone

Our goal is to make our help, advice and services as accessible as possible – no one is excluded.

We help people with accessibility needs to communicate with us a number of different ways. This means that people are empowered, can be independent, and can do what they need to in a similar amount of time and effort as anyone else.

Ways of communicating

Email

Who it’s for: People who prefer written communication

What it is: Email messages can be exchanged, or sent following a phone call, from one person to either one or multiple people.

How we use it: We reply to emails from people in Nottinghamshire as part of our daily duties at the Customer Service Centre. 

Translator via Language Shop

Who it’s for: People whose preferred language is not English

What it is: A live telephone conversation between speakers of different languages through a telephone interpreter.

How we use it: Advisors establish which language is preferred, and dial into a Language Shop translator to progress with the call. 

Minicom

Who it’s for: People with hearing or speech difficulties

What it is: A small electronic typewriter and screen, which are linked to a telephone system. The caller dials in and types their enquiry, which is replied to by an advisor using this technology.

How we use it: This communication method lets us manage the enquiry in a similar way to a telephone call.

Text Relay

Who it’s for: People with hearing or speech difficulties

What it is: A relay assistance service where text messages are converted to speech, and vice versa, enabling two people to communicate with each other.

How we use it: We manage these calls through the telephone enquiry processes, allowing time for the speech/text to be converted. This service is not provided by NCC but our advisors are trained to deal with these enquiries.

Video Relay Service/Video Interpreting Service

Who it’s for: People who are deaf or those with hearing or speech difficulties.

What it is: A video telecommunication service where sign language is converted to speech and vice versa, enabling two people to communicate with each other

How we use it: We manage these calls through the telephony enquiry processes allowing time for the speech/sign language to be converted. This service is not provided by NCC but the advisors are trained to deal with these enquiries.

Written Letter

Who it’s for: All users who prefer written communication

What it is: A written, typed, or printer communication, sent in an envelope by post.

How we use it: Written letters can be received by the Customer Service Centre and enquiries will be managed using our usual processes. Advisors will respond to telephone calls by letter, if requested.

Other ways we can provide information

Large Print

Who it’s for: People with visual impairments

What it is: Information that’s sent out in a larger font.

Braille Print

Who it’s for: People with severe visual impairment

What it is: A tactile reading and writing system which uses raised dots to represent the letters of the print alphabet.

Share this page?