A Day in the Life of ....

An Adult Social Care Team Manager

Introduction

I am Brian and I have been the Team Manager for a Community Learning Disability team for 12 years. I felt ready for this progression 12 years ago as I had various experiences in social care e.g. support worker, deputy manager, social worker and Regulatory Inspector. I felt I would be able to put my experience to good use by supporting a team of field workers.

My daily routine 

My day can start and finish at various times depending on my workload on a particular day/week. I usually like to start my day by checking my e-mails.  I do not necessarily always work from my ‘base’ as we now have equipment that allows us to work more flexibly e.g. from other bases or home.

In a typical day I could be supervising staff, authorising assessments/support plans/financial packages. Chairing meetings e.g. MDT/Safeguarding. I have regular case discussions with Social workers throughout the day and feel it is important to keep informed of what is happening as this also helps me to support my staff effectively.

What sorts of issues do I have to deal with?

As a manager the issues I deal with can range from issues with the building and health and safety matters to crisis situations that demand an urgent social care response. I have support via my manager and business support plus I am fortunate to have a very supportive team of colleagues.

What would you say to someone considering this type of social work?

My most satisfying moments come when there is a sense of completion and a ‘good job done’ e.g. when a Service user has been safeguarded and we are satisfied that all appropriate steps have been taken and can evidence this.

Social work has changed significantly over the years - there are a lot of competing demands on social workers but I believe the work can still be very satisfying. As a social worker you will find yourself working with a diverse service user group with their own unique needs. Without a doubt you will have frustrations along the way as you try and source support and services for people but the sense of satisfaction will often outweigh this frustration.

You should be supported to develop your skills and put your training into practice. With the appropriate support you will be able to manage the many different challenges that being a front-line social worker brings.

 



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