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  • Photo published in the Nottingham Evening Post dated 18th November 1915.
Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
Person Details
Sneinton Nottingham
Ernest was born in 1897, the son of Reuben and Charlotte Carter. Reuben was born in Nottingham in 1841 (A/M/J) and Charlotte was also born in Nottingham; there is a record of a Reuben Carter marrying a Charlotte Fisher in Nottingham in 1893 (A/M/J). According to the 1911 Census when they had been married for 18 years they had had three children of whom only two had survived, Florence (b. 1895) and Ernest (b. 1897). In 1901 Reuben (59), a commissionaire, and Charlotte (45), a hosiery machinist, were living at 66 Lamartine Street, St Ann's, with their two children Florence (6) and Ernest (4). The family was still living at the same address in 1911 but only Charlotte (56), Florence (16) a lace hand, and Ernest (14) an errand lad for a ladies' outfitter, were at home on the night of the census. Reuben has not yet been traced on the census. Reuben died in 1913 (O/N/D Nottingham) aged 72. Florence completed a form for the army in 1919 listing Ernest's surviving relatives; their parents were dead and Florence was now married and living at 34 Gordon Street, Small Heath, Birmingham. She gave her married name as 'Lockley'; there is a marriage record of a Florence Carter marrying James S Blockley (sic) in Nottingham in 1919 (A/M/J).
Member of 2nd Nottingham Company Boys' Brigade (Dakeyne Street Lads' Club). In 1911 Ernest was an errand boy but at the time he attested in the Territorial Force in May 1914 he was a mechanic for Post Office Telephones.
13 Oct 1915
729364 - CWGC Website
2084
(TF) 66 Lamartine Street, Nottingham
Private
1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
He attested in the Territorial Force, Imperial Service Battalion (4 years service in the UK) on 11 May 1914, aged 17 years 3 months. He enlisted along with his friend, Private Ernest Owen [Owen] Smith, another Dako Boy (service number 2087) who was also to serve with the 1/7th Battalion (Robin Hoods) Sherwood Foresters. He was on home service from 11 May 1914-27 February 1915 (293 days) and served in France from 28 February 1915 (Medal Roll: 25 February 1915) until his death the same year (228 days). He was sick from 2 October 1915 until 10 October (rheumatic fever) when he was able to return to duty, but he was killed in action three days later on 13 October in the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt. Owen Smith was killed in the same action and both are commemorated on the Loos Memorial. He qualified for the 1915 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.
Ernest's personal effects comprised a medical health ticket, two prayer books, a testament and photos and these were returned sometime after 14 February 1916 to his sister, Florence, c/o 68 Lamartine Street. His death was recorded in the Boys Brigade Gazette of March 1916. His sister, Florence, was his sole legatee.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photo published in the Nottingham Evening Post dated 18th November 1915.
Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
    Ernest Carter - Photo published in the Nottingham Evening Post dated 18th November 1915. Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.