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  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty, Pas de Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
Person Details
Basford
Harry Mathers was born in 1897 in Old Basford and was the son of John a bleacher and Mary Mathers née Brown, the family's address at the time of Harry's death was 10 Southwark Street, Old Basford, Nottingham. His father John was born in 1853 in Basford and his mother Mary Brown was born in 1855 also in Basford, they were married in 1872 in Basford and they went on to have 8 children, sadly however 5 of them were to die in infancy or early childhood prior to 1911. Their surviving children were Eliza b1880, Hilda b1889 and Harold b1897. In the 1911 census the family were living at 153 Bulwell Lane, Old Basford and were shown as John 58 yrs a bleacher, he is living with his wife Mary 56 yrs and their son Harold 14 yrs a van lad.
03 Jul 1916
19
91452 - CWGC Website
R/9140
Rifleman
13th Bn King's Royal Rifle Corps
Rifleman Harry Mathers, enlisted at Nottingham on 13th August 1914, his age was 19yrs and 38 yrs, he was a collier and his religion was that of a Baptist. He originally served with 9th battalion Sherwood Foresters with service number 12430. He later served with the 13th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps. He landed in France on 31st July 1915. He died of wounds on 3rd July 1916 and is buried in Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty (grave ref l.F.8)
Nottingham Post obituary (abridged): 'Mathers, wounded June 29th, died July 1st (sic), Rifleman H Mathers King's Royal Rifles, 10 Southwark Street, Old Basford, age 19. Mother, father, sisters, brothers Jack and Bill.' Article published in the Nottingham Evening Post 31st July 1915 :- He had written earlier in the year, in a letter published on 21st February 1916, to thank the subscribers to the local cigarette fund. “Rfn. H. Mathers (13th K.R.R.) writes: “Once again I take the pleasure to write to you on behalf of the boys of my section and myself, hoping to find you in the best of health, as it leaves us all the same at present. Our section is the unlucky 13. Very unlucky lot we are, too. No. 13th Section, composed of 13 men, and in the 13th Battalion. Hard luck, isn't it? If there is a party wanted for working they come to the unlucky 13, but when we drawn for leave, well it is never one of the 13. We should be very pleased if any kind friend would send us a few fags, as a Blighty fag is bon. If any friend would be so kind would they please forward them on to 9140 Rfn. H. Mathers, A Coy., 13th Batt., King's Royal Rifles, B.E.F., France. I will see they are shared out fair. We are getting on pretty fair considering the conditions we are under. We all wish Forest the best of luck throughout the season.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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Photos

  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty, Pas de Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Harry Mathers - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty, Pas de Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle