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  • photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the great war 1914-1918 in Worksop library.
Person Details
Worksop, Nottinghamshire
George Hunter Platts was born in Worksop in 1897. His mother would have been Mary Platts who married George Hunter the following year. In 1901 they were living at 53 Sandy Lane where the couple had five more children, Charles born 1899, Jessie in 1902, Ethel 1904, Ada 1907 and May born in 1909. By 1911 the family were resident in Hardy Street, Worksop and George senior was a self employed milk salesman.
17 Oct 1915
27
732514 - CWGC Website
12497
Private
2nd Bn Scots Guards
Pte. George Hunter Worksop Guardian 12 November 1915 Worksop’s list of heroes is increasing and this week we have to chronicle the death in action of yet another of Worksop’s gallant sons, Pte. George Hunter son of Mr and Mrs George Hunter of Hardy Street, Worksop. We have been in receipt of the information for at least a fortnight but is not our custom to rush into print with the news of unofficially notified local casualties. Not until all hope has been given up by the relatives and friends do we publish details of casualties. The first information of the distressing news was conveyed in a letter dated October 20th from a soldier bearing the obviously Scotch name of Kenneth Kennedy who however, did not state his rank. This soldier who was a member of the 2nd Scots Guards, fought side by side – and let it be said, fought as poor George did, bravely, gallantly and like a seasoned soldier – with Hunter. In his letter he says:- “ Dear Mrs Hunter, it is a very sad duty I have to perform – to tell you that your son George, was killed on Sunday morning October 17th. I have been a very great friend of George’s, having come to France at the same time, we have been together out here. On this Sunday morning we were ordered to take a small trench running from our first trench. We got on alright till we reached the head of the trench, when the Germans opened fire on us with a maxim gun. When creeping through and exposed part of the trench, poor George was hit by a bullet and died without a groan. I know what your feelings must be …. “ The fighting around Hulluch where Hunter was killed must have been very severe, for the writer states:- “ It happened at a place called Hulluch .. It is a terrible time. One never knows a moment when one may be struck down and I sometimes think that those who die are indeed the happiest. I must say that George’s death was a severe blow to me, and I am sure I console with you in your great loss. I cannot say much, but I pray God console you and help you bear your great sorrow, yours sincerely, Kenneth Kennedy.” The letter proves what we already know, that Hunter was a steady, popular, well conducted man. He died bravely at the call of duty and a grander end could not be imagined. After working in his native town for some time, he left Worksop in 1913 to work for Lord Hastings in Norfolk. Fifteen months later he went into the employment of Mr George Coats of cotton fame, and worked at his residences either at Melton Mobray, London, Isle of Wight or Scotland. He was in Scotland when he enlisted in December, when he enlisted in the Scots Guards. He left London for the front in May. His frequent letters home were very bright and cheery, and he made light of his hardships. When Mr and Mrs Hunter received the letter from Kennedy, Mrs Hunter immediately wrote him for further details, but although the communication was sent three weeks ago, no reply has been received. In this their hour of trial, Mr and Mrs Hunter will receive the heartfelt sympathy of a wide circle of friends. It is not hard however, to find consolation, their son died bravely, nobly fighting on behalf of freedom, liberty and honour. The Rev. H Gray, the vicar of St Anne’s Church, had a high regard for the deceased soldier, for writing in the Parish Magazine he says, “ We offer our heartfelt sympathy with Mr and Mrs Hunter on the loss of their eldest son – always a good lad and one whose letters from the front were cheery and bright. Fortunately, the end came quickly. “
Commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the great war 1914-1918 in Worksop library.
    George Hunter - photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the great war 1914-1918 in Worksop library.