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  • Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking the grave of Joshua Woolley, Nottingham General Cemetery. Courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Radford Nottingham
Joshua was born in 1880, the son of John and Mary Ann Woolley. When John completed the census in 1911 he declared that he had been married for 40 years and that he and his wife Mary Ann had had 12 children of whom only 10 were still living. Ten children were named on the four census between 1881 and 1911: Sarah Ann, Ada, John T, William Hy, Joshua (b. 1880), Kate E (b. 1883), Beatrice, Ethel, Lewis/Louis (b. 1890) and George. All the children were born in Radford. Their father was employed variously as a fishmonger and fishhawker, generally on his own account, but at the time of his death in 1911 was a fish salesman. In 1881 John and Mary were living at 36 Hornbuckle Street, Radford with their five children, Sarah Ann (10), Ada (8), John (6), William (4) and Joshua (6 months). By 1891 they had moved to 23 Denison Street, Radford. There were now nine children in the family; Sarah (20) a wool winder, Ada (18) a hosiery seamer, John (16), William (14) a wool winder, Joshua (10), Kate (8), Beatrice (5), Ethel (3) and Louis (1). Ten years later in 1901 the family was at 107 Norton Street, Radford. Only seven children were in the household on the night of the census including the youngest in the family, George, who had been born since the previous census; William (24) a wood sawyer, Joshua (21) a lace threader, Kate (18) a lace mender, Beatrice (16) also a lace mender, Ethel (13) a cigar worker, Louis (11) and George (1). By 1911 John and Mary were living at 151 Norton Street, Radford, with only four children at home on the night of the census; Beatrice (25), a lace mender, Ethel (23) a cigar maker, Louis (21) a bobbin and carriage hand and George (17) a joiner. Also in the household was their grandson, Leonard (3, b. 1908 Sneinton). Joshua had left home and at the time of the census was a waiter living at 39 Hawkridge Street, Radford, the home of his married sister, Ada Thorpe (38) and her husband, John Frederick Thorpe (39), a brew house keeper. Also in the house was their sister, Annie [Sarah Ann] Woolley (40) a lace hand. Joshua's father, John, died the same year on 2 December 1911. His mother, Mary Ann, died just seven months later on 8 June 1912. The notice of Joshua's death in 1918 indicates that at least two of his brothers, George and Louis, also served in the war.
In 1901 he was a lace threader. In 1911 he was a waiter.
26 Feb 1918
35
2750647 - CWGC Website
19319
He was living in Radford when he enlisted in Nottingham
16th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Private Joshua Woolley, “B” Company, 16th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment (Chatsworth Rifles), formerly 10th Battalion. He landed in France on 16th December 1915 and died at the Red Cross Hospital, Netley, on 26th February 1918. He is buried in Nottingham General Cemetery.He died in the Red Cross Hospital, Netley, and was interred in Nottingham General Cemetery. He qualified for the 1915 Star, British war medal and Victory Medal.
Nottingham Evening Post notice (abridged) 28 February 1918. 'WOOLLEY on the 25th (sic) at Military Hospital, Pte Joe Woolley, brother of Bert(?), George and Lewis (Mesopotamia and Egypt). Interred General Cemetery.' Joshua's sister, Beatrice, was his sole legatee. Probate: Woolley John of 151 Norton-street Nottingham fish salesman died 2 December 1911 Probate Nottingham 23 February to Mary Ann Woolley widow. Effects £517 7s. Probate: Woolley Mary Ann of 151 Norton-street Nottingham widow died 8 June 1912 Probate Nottingham 4 September to Sarah Ann Woolley spinster and Ada Thorpe (wife of Frederick William Thorpe). Effects £428.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking the grave of Joshua Woolley, Nottingham General Cemetery. Courtesy of Peter Gillings
    Joshua Woolley - Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking the grave of Joshua Woolley, Nottingham General Cemetery. Courtesy of Peter Gillings