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  • Photograph published on 16th August 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch Newspaper and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
He was thes son of Francis William and Mary Sheldon of 16 Bolsover Street Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire. He was the brother of Francis Arthur, Albert Leslie and Clarice May Sheldon.
In 1911 he was a winder of wool and silk.
03 Aug 1917
21
153978 - CWGC Website
28893
Private
17th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Pte. Reginald Harris Sheldon, enlisted on 7th August 1915 at Hucknall and served with 17th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire)Regiment (Welbeck Rangers), died of wounds on 3rd August 1917. He is buried in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
He was wounded by a shell around midnight on 31st July 1917 while bring rations up to the line. Evacuated to No. 47 Casualty Clearing Station, on 3rd August 1917 he was helped to write, adding his shaky signature to a letter written by someone else, giving his family the news that he had been wounded. In the meantime, one of his friends wrote to his own family in Nottingham to say that Sheldon’s “knees had been blown away,” news which made its way to Hucknall shortly afterwards. It took five days for that letter to arrive in Hucknall. The following day, 9th August, his brother, Arthur, received the news from an army chaplain that Sheldon had died – the same day as the letter 'he' sent home, 3rd August 1917. “47 C.C.S., [Casualty Clearing Station] B.E.F. [British Expeditionary Force] “5.8.17 “Dear Sir, “It is with great regret that I write to inform you of the death of your brother, Private R. H. Sheldon, 17th N. and D. He died in this hospital from wounds on August 3, and I buried him yesterday in the soldiers’ cemetery at Dozinghem. The number of his grave is Plot 2, G4. I have packed his personal effects, which will be forwarded to his next-of-kin in due course, but I could only find your address among his letters of his relatives. Believe me, yours very truly, ARCHIBALD LONGRIDGE, C.F., C. of E. Chaplain. Shortly afterwards, two fellow members of the Welbeck Rangers’ Transport Section wrote to his parents to express their sympathy. “Dear Mrs. Sheldon – We thought that being two of his pals, we would write and let you know of the sad thing that has happened to poor Reg whilst he was doing his duty taking rations to the lads in the trenches during a very severe battle. Believe us, it is hard to tell you he was seriously wounded, and died a few days afterwards in hospital. We can assure you, Mrs. Sheldon, everything that could be done was done for him. Nothing more could have been done to relieve his pains. If you care to answer these few lines, address to Pte. J. Burton, 31234, 17th S. F. Transport Section, B.E.F. “With him [Burton] coming from his native place you will know him better than me. I knew him myself quite well before he joined the Army. I used to be on the police force at Hucknall, so I knew him well by sight. We can assure you he was one of the best, and was respected by all who knew him, especially the lads in the transport, and you have their sympathy in your great loss. For the sake of his pals, don’t take it too hard. Believe us to remain, yours most sorrowfully, J. BURTON and M. SMITHSON.” Above letters were published on 16th and 23rd August 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch Newspaper and are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918 he also provided the information concerning his death.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph published on 16th August 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch Newspaper and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Reginald Harris Sheldon - Photograph published on 16th August 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch Newspaper and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918