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  • Photograph published on 8th June 1916 in Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire
He was the son of Reuben and Mary Newbold and the brother of Clara, Frank and Reuben Newbold of 29 Brickyard Road Butler's Hill Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire.
He was an apprentice printer in 1911.
31 May 1916
19
2866839 - CWGC Website
Bristol Z/4394
Able Seaman
HMS Black Prince Royal Navy
HMS Black Prince was sunk at Jutland on May 31st 1916. The circumstances surrounding her loss were unclear for many years because there were no positive sightings of Black Prince after 17.42. Recent historians hold to the German account of the ship's sinking. Black Prince briefly engaged the German battleship Rheinland at about 23:35 GMT, scoring two hits with 6-inch shells. Separated from the rest of the British fleet, Black Prince approached the German lines at approximately midnight. She turned away from the German battleships, but it was too late. The German battleship Thüringen fixed Black Prince in her searchlights and opened fire. Up to five other German ships, including battleships Nassau, Ostfriesland, and Friedrich der Grosse, joined in the bombardment, with return fire from Black Prince being ineffective. Most of the German ships were between 750 and 1500 yards of Black Prince - effectively point blank range for contemporary naval gunnery. Black Prince was hit by at least twelve heavy shells and several smaller ones, sinking within 15 minutes. There were no survivors from Black Prince's crew, all 857 being killed.
Article published on 8th June 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch :- A.B. Charles Newbold, R.N.V.R., was killed in action at Jutland aboard H.M.S. Black Prince on 31st May 1916. He is commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. His death was reported in the local press on 8th June 1916: “Herewith we give a portrait of Charles Newbold, who was an able seaman on the Black Prince, which went down with all hands in the severe naval fight on May 31st in the North Sea. The youth, who was 19 years of age, was the son of Mrs. Newbold, of 29 Brickyard road, Butler's Hill, and of the late Mr. Reuben Newbold. “He enlisted in the Royal Navy last October, [1915] and, after three months' training, was rated on the Black Prince. It was a severe wrench for him to leave his widowed mother, but when he had reached 19 years of age, he felt that he must do his little bit, and did not relish the idea of being fetched as a conscript. “From the letters to hand he always spoke in good terms of the sailor's life, and had no regrets for the course he had taken. In his last message home a few days before the fight he referred to the glorious weather on the ocean, and said he expected being home on leave very shortly. That home-coming has been denied him, and he now rests serenely beneath the waves. “The deceased, who was a printer, was formerly employed at the Dispatch Office, and since the death of his father had realised the great purpose in life, and was eager to do his utmost for the upkeep of the home, and to comfort his widowed mother. He attended St. John's Church, and occasionally officiated as organist. “The people of the neighbourhood deeply sympathise with Mrs. Newbold, and the family on the loss which has befallen them.” article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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  • Photograph published on 8th June 1916 in Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Charles Newbold - Photograph published on 8th June 1916 in Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918