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  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian.
Courtesy of Robert Illett
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
John Garside was born in Gateford Road, Worksop in 1881. He was the fifth child born to Worksop born couple, Frank and Annie Garside. Frank had a lifelong occupation as a joiner, Throughout their married life they had 9 children over a period of 22 years. By 1901, John, or Jack as he was sometimes known as, had left the family home at 32 Gladstone Street, along with four of his elder siblings. In 1911 he was living at 563 Fulham Road, Fulham, London, working as barman and living in the residence of head of house, Alfred Webber, licensed publican, along with 7 other bar and domestic staff. The following year, in 1912 at Worksop, his father, Frank, died age 60. He joined the army in 1916, went to France and when he returned married Margaret S Hume on Dec 22 1917 at Hammersmith, London. He had known Margaret from his barman working days when they were sharing the same accommodation in Fulham in 1911. The marriage lasted 4 months to the day, due to his death in France.
22 Apr 1918
36
81346 - CWGC Website
50522
Private
15th Bn Welsh Regiment
Pte. Jack Garside Worksop Guardian 3 May 1918 The sympathy of all of her many friends will be extended to Mrs. Annie Garside, 7,Eastgate Worksop, widow of the late Mr. Frank Garside, in the bereavement she has sustained by the death of her son, Pte. Jack Garside, of the Welsh Regiment. Before the war the late soldier was a trusted employee at the stores of the Worksop and Retford Brewery Co. He enlisted in 1916, and had been in France over twelve months. He was home on leave in December last, and was married in London on December 22nd. The news of his death is contained in a letter written to his mother by the Rev. J.P.Rees., who says:- “I am very sorry to have to inform you that your son was killed by a shell yesterday evening (April 22nd). His officer was killed at the same time. Your son had won a very good name in the battalion, and was respected by all his officers and loved by his mates. I write with very great sympathy indeed, as he acted twice for me as orderly when my own boy was on leave. I also had the privilege of preparing him for confirmation. No one I fancy, except a few freaks could enjoy life actually in the line, but his general life in the army I think appealed to him. He told me it had made him a different man of him in health and in strength, and when the war was over he was going in for the outdoor life. We have had a very busy and trying time the last few days, and I have not had my own clothes off for over a week. I have a good many sad letters to write, so if I do not write more it is only because I have not the time. Any private possessions he may have had on him will be forwarded to you in due course. With all my sympathy for you in your hour of trial yours sincerely”. Pte. Garside was 37 years of age, and had many friends in the town who will be saddened to think that he is one of the many Worksop lads that won’t return home. Three other sons are serving in H.M.Forces. The eldest, Pte. George Garside is in the Labour Battalion. Another brother, Pte. Frank Garside R.E., won the D.C.M., under circumstances previously reported in the Worksop Guardian, and Pte. Ben Garside is in hospital at Bury, happily recovering from the affects of gas.
Contay British Cemetery, Contay
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian.
Courtesy of Robert Illett
    John Garside - Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian. Courtesy of Robert Illett
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Contay British Cemetery, Contay, Somme, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    John Garside - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Contay British Cemetery, Contay, Somme, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle