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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Swinton, Rotherham Yorkshire
Frederick William Lucas was the only son of James and Mary Ann Lucas, nee Stanley. James spent all his life working as a railway signalman. Frederickwas born in Swinton, Rotherham Yorkshire on 10th November 1880 where the three of them spent many years resident at 20 Charles Street, Swinton. By 1901, when Frederick was 21, he was working as a stove grate burnisher. In 1903, his mother died age 69 and his father, James re-married at the age of 59 to Lizzie in 1909 and continued living in Swinton at 35 Crossland Street. Frederick had himself, previously married in Swinton to Venessa Parker and 2 years later, were resident at 99 Gateford Road, Worksop where he was working in his old trade as a stove grate fitter.
23 Sep 1917
38
2939008 - CWGC Website
66687
Private
26th Bn Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
Pte. Fred V. Lucas Worksop Guardian 5 October 1917 To the long list of Worksop men who have fallen on the field of battle the names of others must this week be added. Sacrifice is the price of victory, and in the great offensive, which is slowly but surely, clearing Northern France of the Germans, our local lads have played a prominent and conspicuous part. Amongst the fallen is Pte. Fred V. Lucas, of the Royal Fusiliers, who resided in Gateford road, where his wife has a fish and chip shop, and who prior to enlisting, was a filer at Messrs. Steel and Garland’s, Ltd., Worksop. Pte lucas enlisted in the North Staffords on March 7th this year, and in the following June he was in France, where he was transferred to the Royal Fusiliers. Last week-end Mrs. Lucas received a letter from the Chaplain, the Rev. W. H. Pelham, telling her that her husband had been wounded in the side, though not dangerously. “I hope,” he wrote, “you will soon hear from him himself”. Unfortunately, Lucas must have been more severely wounded than was first apparent, for on Sunday Mrs. Lucas received the news from the Hospital Matron that her husband had died. He was taken in on September 21st, and everything possible was done for him; but his injuries were mortal, and he passed peacefully away. “He seemed quite conscious that his end was near,” writes the Sister (Miss A. Wright), “and he sent you his love when I asked him if he had any message to send.” Poor gallant Lucas, his warfare was soon accomplished. He had only been a soldier a few months, and he met his death bravely and composedly. He is one of the many who has died for us at home. He was 37 years of age, and leaves no children. Like his widow, with whom great sympathy is felt, he was a native of Swinton, and he had been in Worksop nine years. He was a quiet, steady, and well conducted man, and was much liked by all who knew him. It is rather singular that the news that her husband had been wounded reached Mrs. Lucas from another source, almost by the same post as the letter from the Chaplain. This was from Pte. A. M. Poulton, a comrade who stated that before going into the advance, Lucas and he arranged to inform each others relatives should anything happen to either of them. In the fight Poulton came through uninjured and Lucas, as we have seen, was fatally wounded.
Formerly 37121, S. Staffs Regt. CWG additional information:- Husband of V. Lucas, of 62, Newcastle Avenue, Worksop, Notts. Buried Westouter Churchyard and Extension, Belgium. Research by Colin Dannatt
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Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Frederick William Lucas - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.