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  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian, courtesy of Robert Illett
Person Details
Grimsby, Lincolnshire
Thomas Richard Seymour was born in Grimsby, Lincolnshire in 1896. His parents were John Matthew Seymour and Kate Elizabeth Gregory who had married in Middlesborough in 1892. It was after this that the couple spent a few years in Grimsby where John earned his living as a domestic gardener and apart from Thomas, had two more children, Alice in 1884 and Kathleen in 1895. By 1901, the family were living in Upper Hallam, Sheffield and had had another daughter, Elsie there in 1898. With a 10 year gap, their last daughter, Juanita Charity was born in 1908 at Winchester. The family settled eventually in Worksop and in 1911 were residing at 13 Anston Ave. Thomas Richard Seymour at this time was no longer living in the family home and after his death in France, his parents were still in Worksop, at 150 Carlton Road.
24 Jul 1916
20
305621 - CWGC Website
3044
Private
1/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Pte Dick Seymour Worksop Guardian 18 August 1916 The many acquaintances of Mr and Mrs John Seymour, 150 Carlton Road, Worksop, will hear with deep regret of the death in action of their only son, Pte T R Seymour, Scout Section, 1-8th Notts and Derby Regiment, who will be better remembered as “Dick.” Some doubt existed as to what really happened to Seymour, and a report that he was missing reached his parents a few days ago. After a trying time of waiting, however, always in the belief that their son would turn up again, the official news of his death reached them on Tuesday morning and letters from the deceased’s comrades and officer at the front, told more fully of the circumstances of his death. Some consolation will be afforded the deceased’s parents and his sister by the knowledge that the sympathy of all will be extended to them in their great bereavement. The first intimation concerning the deceased was received last week and stated that he was missing. It was from Lance Corpl Hickman, of the same section as deceased and read:- “Dear Mrs Seymour, it is with many regrets that I have to write to you, to let you know that your son is missing, but we have every hope of him being a prisoner of war. He went out to patrol with the officer on Sunday and got to the German barbed wire. They made their way through, and were patrolling inside when a German sentry saw them, and the enemy soon began to bomb them. Our men gave them some bombs in return and it was then that Dick was last seen. We know he was not wounded at the time. Two men went out to find him later, but could pick up no traces of him.” Lieut. Howard de C Martelli, the officer whom deceased went out with, wrote:- I suppose by the time you get this wee letter you will have heard that your son, who has been reported missing, has been killed. I am heartily sorry for it as he was one of the very best men we had in the company, and one who never grumbled. He was out patrolling with me on Sunday July 22nd. There was four of us and we were taken by surprise by a German patrol, at least three times our own size. We were not two yards off them before we saw them, and a first shot knocked me over, and when I recovered consciousness the remainder of our patrol had disappeared. After searching for a while, I returned to our trenches, and found that the men had returned but your son had not got in. I went out to look for him, but could not find him, so I thought and hoped he had been taken prisoner. When I returned from the hospital, I heard he had been killed instantly by a bullet. Today he was buried in a little cemetery just behind the lines. I know it must be very hard for you and all his friends, but you must remember that your boy was one of our brave number that answered the call, and if ever a man faced it unflinchingly, he did. He was always ready in the face of danger, discomforts and everything …Howard de C Martelli.” The deceased, being able to speak German, which language he learnt when he was in Switzerland, was very useful to his officers, and he was a good scout. He was 20 years of age and joined the Army in November 1914, and had been 13 months in France. His last leave was 15 months ago. He was employed by the Maple Dairy Co. Ltd, before he enlisted and his late manager has written a very nice letter to his mother
CWGC - Son of John Matthew Seymour and Kate Elizabeth Seymour, of 150, Carlton Rd., Worksop, Notts. Buried in the Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery Foncquevillas, France. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian, courtesy of Robert Illett
    Thomas Richard Seymour - Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian, courtesy of Robert Illett
  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery, Foncquevillers, Pas De Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Thomas Richard Seymour - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery, Foncquevillers, Pas De Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle