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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop Notts
Herbert Roe was born in Worksop in 1893. His parents were David and Elizabeth Roe, who in 1901, were living at 33 Newcastle Ave, Worksop with 5 of Herbert’s siblings, (all boys),William, Warren, Charles, Arthur, and Thomas. David Roe was a joiner/carpenter by trade. By 1911, Herbert had left the family home at Worksop and was billeted as a private in the 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, in Sheffield.
26 May 1915
22
920619 - CWGC Website
2963
Corporal
2nd Bn Northumberland Fusiliers
Worksop Guardian 29 October 1915 'Corporal Herbert Roe With pride mingled with sorrow, it is our duty to chronicle that yet another of Worksop’s gallant sons has filled a soldiers grave. It is Corporal Herbert Roe, son of Mr and Mrs David Roe, of 81 Newcastle Avenue. Corporal Roe, who was with the Northumberland Fusiliers, was the respected son of equally respected parents, and very popular amongst a very wide circle of friends, and his loss will be deeply deplored. To his parents and other relatives, sincere sympathy will be extended in their hour of trial, but Herbert died on behalf of a noble cause. There can be no doubt, we are afraid, that the gallant soldier has been killed. As previously announced in the “Worksop Guardian” , Corporal Roe was admitted to No.6 Stationary Hospital, Havre on April 21st, suffering from a gunshot wound to the scalp, but was discharged on April 29th. Another misfortune befell him in May which he was admitted to the Meerut British General Hospital, Ruen, suffering from measles. He was discharged sixteen days later and took part in the subsequent fighting. In July, however, he was reported missing by the War Office and the “Worksop Guardian” reproduced his photograph in the hope that some of his colleagues would identify him and supply information to his anxious parents. No news of his whereabouts have reached Worksop, however, until this week when after five months, a colleague, who desires to remain anonymous, has written to Mr and Mrs Roe to the effect that poor Herbert was killed. No details of his last fight are to hand, but we are very sure that Herbert died as he had lived, a brave, steady, well conducted young man. He came of a patriotic Worksop family. His eldest brother, Warren enlisted but has since been discharged and another brother, Charles, who was formerly employed at Messrs. Freeman, Hardy and Willis, attempted to enlist but did not succeed, Not to be denied the honour of fighting for King and country, he underwent an operation to become “fit” and is now with the Royal Engineers.'
Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Herbert Roe - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.