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Person Details
Mansfield Notts
John Wilfred Richardson was born 1896 in Mansfield, Notts. He was the first born to John Richardson and Minnie Valentine Moore who had married in 1893 at Mansfield. John was a corn miller and in 1901 was living in Station Road, Sutton in Ashfield. The couple had another three children whilst living in Sutton, Rebecca born 1899, Mary in 1901 and David born 1903. Circa 1905, the family had moved to Worksop where another daughter was born in 1908, who was named Winifred. Their residence in Worksop was 69 Eastgate. John senior was still working as a corn miller and John Wilfred had started work as a sweeper and machine cleaner in a local flour mill. He enlisted from here in the RMLI on the 10 Aug 1914.
20 Jul 1915
19
626487 - CWGC Website
PLY/17660
Private
Plymouth Bn Royal Marine Light Infantry
Pte. John Wilfred Richardson Worksop Guardian 6 August 1915 Information has this week been received of the death of Pte. John Wilfred Richardson of the Royal Marine Light Infantry which occurred on August 1st from enteric. Pte Richardson who was only 19 years of age was the son of Mr and Mrs J Richardson, Cycle dealers of 108 Eastgate, Worksop. On May 6th information was received that he had been wounded in the Dardanells, while serving with the Royal Marine Brigade of the Royal Naval Division and a further communication stated that he was only slightly wounded in the right leg, and was in the Egyptian Army Hospital at Abbassiah. On July 18th another letter was received stating he was lying dangerously ill at Malta with enteric fever. The notice of his death from the Record Office of the Naval Division stated that a telegram from Alexandria had been received, announcing the same, but in all probability the death occurred in Malta. The notification also contains a letter of sympathy with the relatives from the King and Queen and signed by Mr A J Balfour, the first Lord of the Admiralty. Pte Richardson was a good type of youth, a member of St Anne’s Bible Class, and sympathy is expressed with his parents especially as escaping from the rifle bullet he fell a victim to the dread enteric fever.
Buried in the East Mudros Military Cemetery, Greece. Research by Colin Dannatt The fact that John is buried on Mudros, the base of the MEF nearest to Gallipoli suggests that he must have recovered sufficiently from his attack of 'enteric' to be returned to duty but succumbed on the journey. Robert Ilett August 2015
Remembered on