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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
In 1891, Tom Henry Moore was born in Worksop at 33 Marecroft. He was named after his father, also called Tom Henry Moore. His mother was Lucy Emma Turner from Mansfield, and as such, married in Mansfield in 1882. Their move to Worksop was permanent and after Tom was born, they had two more children, , Lucy Eliz born 1894 and Bernard, born 1895. By 1901, their father was working as a builder and living at 50 Potter Street. They were still at the same address 10 years later, but by now Toms mother, Lucy was running a butchers shop with the assistance of son Tom. Tom married Maud Winifred Homer on the 23 June 1913 at St Johns church, Worksop and had a child, Reginald Bernard in 1916 which was the same year that Tom senior passed away age 55
21 Mar 1918
27
781657 - CWGC Website
86529
Lance Corporal
59th Bn Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)
Lance Corpl. T. H. Moore Worksop Guardian 24 May 1918 After some weeks of great anxiety and suspense. Mr.s. T.H.Moore, 186, Newgate Street, Worksop, has received the news that her husband, Lance. Corpl. Thomas Henry Moore was killed in action on March 21st. Though the news is not official, circumstances all point to its correctness and much sympathy will be expressed with Mrs Moore and also with the gallant soldier’s widowed mother, sister, and brother, and other relatives. Lance Corpl. Moore was the eldest son of the late Mr. T.H.Moore, who at one time, was a promising figure in the public life of Worksop. After his father’s death. Mr. Moore assisted his mother in her business, and later, also carried on a business of his own. He was a smart industrious and active young man, a credit to his family and to the town. He was very well liked, and his cheeriness and good nature made him a host of friends. He enlisted in November 1915 or 1916, in the Nott’s and Derby’s Regiment, and was shortly after was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He had been in France about 14 months, and the news that he had fallen will be received with sincere regret by his many friends. He was reported missing on March 21st, and in reply to enquiries made by his wife, deceased Commanding Officer wrote:- “I am sorry the facts are so scanty, yet at the same time, I think you can hope to hear that he is a prisoner. There are bound to have been many who are prisoners. Your husband did his duty very thoroughly, and stayed at his post when perhaps, others might have gone away. You have every cause to feel proud of him and I am sure he too, would wish you to hope for the best. That you may hear from him is my very sincere wish.” The hope that Lance Corpl. Moore is a prisoner was shattered by a letter which Mrs. Moore received from friends at Halifax of her husbands great chum, Corpl. Walter Trott. The two had struck up a friendship when they first met and they were chums to the end. Trott who was taken prisoner states in his letter that Moore was killed instantly, and suffered no pain. He asks his friends to break the news to Mrs. Moore. “Mr. and Mrs. Trott join with me (says the writer) in deepest sympathy, and trust God will give you strength to bear up in your great bereavement. Yours in the deepest sympathy L.M.Taylor” Lance. Corpl. Moore was 27 years of age, and leaves one child, 18 months old. His brother Bernard Moore, aged 23, is with the Royal Canadians in Palestine.
Formerly 65662, Notts and Derby Regt Commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France. Research by Colin Dannatt
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Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Tom Henry Moore - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.