[Skip to content]



  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Clapham, Surrey
The son of Charles Thomas and Clara Annie Garrett, Charles Harold Garrett was born at 5 Jasmine Terrace, Clapham, Surrey in the year 1889 and was baptised on the 14th July of the same year. His father was an undertaker, builder and later also added the job of parish clerk. Two more sons were born, Alan Leslie 1 Dec 1892 and Laurence Hugh 19 Jan 1899. In 1911, the family were registered at 28 Old Town, Clapham, and Charles Harold Garrett recorded as an undergraduate. Although he took an ecclesiastical line, his two younger brothers were indentured into the building trade, their master being their father. Charles junior moved to Worksop after 1911 to take up his duties at Worksop Priory Church, living at 69 Watson Road
Assistant priest at the Priory Church, Worksop
26 Sep 1917
28
140031 - CWGC Website
Chaplain
Army Chaplains' Department
Gazetted 22 February 1917 to be Chaplain to the Forces, 4th Class. Attd. 2nd/6th Bn South Staffordshire Regiment. The Rev. C. H. Garrett Worksop Guardian 5 October 1917 “Greater love has no man than this that a man lays down his life for his friends” These sublime words at once occur to the mind in connection with the death from wounds of the Rev. Charles Harold Garret, B. A., of Worksop Priory Church, and Chaplain to the forces. So far, the full story of the incident in which Mr. Garrett played a most heroic and self- denying part has not reached us, but sufficient information is available to show that he died doing his duty as Priest and man. It would seem that in the recent fighting Mr. Garrett accompanied the doctor in the advance which the troops to which he was attached was about to make. The objective in view was a dug- out, or German “Pill box” and this, after heavy fighting, was captured. By some chance the doctor was taken prisoner, and Mr. Garrett remained in the captured position with the lads who were holding it against the foe. His presence, he no doubt thought, would cheer them, and he could at least help to bind up their wounds and pray with them in the hour of death. A change this from the quiet Solemnity of the Priory Church which he loved so well, and along the vaulted aisles of which his rich voice had so often rolled in waves of sacred song. The Germans continued to shell the position in the hope of driving out the British, and one can hardly imagine the horror of it all- the noise of the bursting shells, and all the fearful sounds of the battlefield. Calmly and composedly the Chaplain stuck to it along with the boys- one of whom he had known in happier days- until a shell burst right in their midst, and fell mortally wounded. He died afterwards whilst being conveyed to the advanced dressing station. He was buried the next day by a brother Chaplain, and we may rest assured that the soldiers who gathered round keenly felt the loss of a brave young Priest and mourned for him as for one near and dear to them. Mr. Garrett was 28 years of age in May last. He had been about five years in Worksop, and was appointed an Army Chaplain early in the present year. Six weeks ago he was allowed leave of absence and spent one Sunday in Worksop, much to his delight, and to the pleasure of many friends. Little did the latter think that they should see his face no more this side the veil. The first intimation that Mr. Garrett had been wounded reached the Vicar, the Rev. G. J. A. d’Arcy, on Friday evening. At even song he announced the receipt of a telegram from the Chaplain-General enquiring for the addresses of Mr. Garrett’s next of kin, and from this it was feared that something serious had happened. The Vicar, of course, replied to the telegram without delay, and asked for particulars, and these have only recently come to hand. Mr. Garrett is believed to have died on Wednesday 26th, and a letter was received from him that morning by his friend and protégé, George Ledger, in which he describes the position they were in and the terrible fighting that was going on. The news has caused great sorrow in Worksop, and sincere sympathy is expressed with Mr. Garrett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Garrett, Clapham, London, and other members of the family in their bereavement. His two brothers are also serving, one in the flying Corps, and the other in the Inns of Court Corps, O. T. C. To the vicar, Mr. Garrett’s death is a great blow. He has lost a loyal and faithful colleague, one full of energy and zeal. Allusion has already been made to Mr. Garrett’s musical abilities, and we need only add in the short space at our disposal, that he was a tower of strength to the choir, a good singer and an able preacher. He was especially happy in his work amongst boys and young men, and it was a great happiness to him when he ascertained that he had been appointed to the Brigade in which many Worksop lads were serving. He renewed old acquaintances in the dug-outs and trenches, and many Worksop lads now in Khaki will read the news of his death with sorrow in the heart. He had perished in a good cause, and like a warrior was overthrown. A memorial service will be held at the Priory Church on Tuesday next at 8pm. Later particulars:- In a letter received yesterday by Mrs. Wood, Mr Garretts housekeeper, his mother sends the following extract from the Senior Chaplains letter as to her sons death:- “He was at his battalion regimental aid post (being of the greatest help and comfort), when he was seriously wounded by a shell. He was taken to the advanced dressing station, where he was quite conscious and received the reserved Sacrament at the hands of Mr. Wilkinson, ( a brother Chaplain), who will write you, but he died on the way to the main dressing station, and has been laid to rest in the cemetery close by. I did not intend to let him go in the line with his brigade, but when he learned I had arranged to keep him back, he pleaded so earnestly that I altered my arrangements. Dear boy, he was so anxious to be with the men in their danger and share it with them. May God rest his soul and give you all much consolation. He had grown very close to a great number of hearts out here in the last few weeks.
CWG additional information:- Eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Garrett, of Old Town, Clapham, London. B.A., late Assistant Priest of The Priory Church, Worksop, Notts. attd. 2nd/6th Bn South Staffordshire Regiment. Buried at Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No. 3, Belgium. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Rev Charles Harold Garrett - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Brandhoek  Military cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Rev Charles Harold Garrett - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Brandhoek Military cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle