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  • This photograph was originally published in the Worksop Guardian. Courtesy of Robert Illett
Person Details
Fulbourn, Cambridgeshire
George Morris Coe was born in Fulbourn, Cambridgeshire in 1878. Although his middle name appears in army records as Morris, he was actually named at birth as Maris, which was his mother’s maiden name. His mother, Mary Ann, married Elijah Coe and the couple spent the remainder of their lives resident at Fulbourn. Apart from George, they had another 9 children, all born in Fulbourn, where Elijah worked as a labourer and later as a boiler man in the Fulbourn lunatic asylum. George Left the family home between 1891 and 1901 when he joined the army. After serving his time, he came to Worksop where he married Annie May Danby in September 1911. Although being born in Lincolnshire, she had been bought up in Worksop, from infancy, her parents being the Inn keeper and licence victualler of the Blue Bell pub at 37 Norfolk Street for well over 20 years. The couple had 2 children before George met his fate, John, in 1912 and Emeline in 1913.
13 Sep 1916
37
761154 - CWGC Website
G/6771
Company Sergeant Major
10th Bn The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)
The obituary of Sergt, Major George Coe Worksop Guardian 29 September 1916 We very much regret to have to record the death in France of Co. Sergt-Major George Coe, of the 10th Royal West Kents, who was instantly killed in action by a shell on September 13th while in the front line. The news of his death was conveyed to his wife at Park Street, Worksop, by the Lieut, of his Company, who wrote:- “Dear Mrs. Coe, -it is with very much regret that I write to tell you of the death of your husband, C.S.M. Coe, he was in the front line with the rest of “A” Company, and about 9.30 in the morning of September 13th a large piece of shell hit him and killed him instantly. I do not know if Major Beattie wrote to you; he got wounded himself, but I’m sure he thought a lot of your husband. He had endeared himself to the whole Company, and I can assure you we officers who remain mourn him very much, both as a fellow worker and as a comrade. At night we buried him in front of the trench we were holding, I’m sure he will be a great loss to you, but I hope you will be able to bear it a little bit more cheerfully by knowing he died fighting for King and Country,-with very kind regards, believe me, Yours sincerely, Vernon Holden, Sec,Lieut:…19th Royal West Kent Regiment.” Sergt: Major Coe was a soldier in the pre-war days, and became a Corp, in the Grenadier Guards. With this famous Regiment he saw service in Egypt and South Africa. He left the Army with excellent credentials, and came to reside in Worksop. After finding a position in the Workhouses in Folkestone. the call came, and though he had already done his “Whack” he enlisted on June 1st, 1915, in the Royal West Kents, and Mrs Coe and their two children returned to Worksop to her parents. He wrote to his wife on the day previous to that on which he was killed. It was a cheerful letter, saying that he was alright and he believed they had got top side of the Hun. And he looked forward of returning to Worksop to his wife and children before long. Serg. Major Coe was a native of Fulbourne, Cambridgeshire. Further information as to her husband’s death reached Mrs. Coe from the Co. Q.M.S., who says: “Dear Mrs. Coe,-I enclose cheque which represents the amount of money in possession of your husband. Since writing you I have further particulars of his death, and as a slight consolation can tell you that his end was quite instantaneous. The N.C.O.’s and the boys of “A” Co. all deeply sympathise with you. No one could have been missed more, every one respecting and admiring him. No matter how bad things were, he always cheered the men up, and by his coolness helped the whole Company through. If there are any further particulars you would like I will write to you again. Accept my personal sympathy in your terrible trial. I have lost in George one of my best pals, a real man. Your Sincerely R.H. Kingham, Co,-Q.M.S “A” Co. “
CWGC - Son of M. Coe, of Hinton Rd., Fulbourne, Cambs, and the late Elijah Coe; husband of Annie May Coe, of 158, High St., Shoeburyness, Essex. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • This photograph was originally published in the Worksop Guardian. Courtesy of Robert Illett
    George Morris Coe - This photograph was originally published in the Worksop Guardian. Courtesy of Robert Illett
  • Photograph of the Thiepval memorial,The Somme upon which George Morris Coe's name is commemorated.
Courtesy of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    George Morris Coe - Photograph of the Thiepval memorial,The Somme upon which George Morris Coe's name is commemorated. Courtesy of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission