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  • Photograph provided courtesy of The War Graves Photographic Project www.twgpp.org
Person Details
19 Jul 1894
Walkeringham
Ernest was born on 19 July 1894 at Walkeringham, the son of William and Annie Burden (nee Taylor). William and Annie were married in 1892 (marriage registered Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, Oct/Nov/Dec). William was an engineering labourer by trade. At the time of the 1911 census he and Annie had been married for 18 years and had had seven children, all of whom were still living at the time of the census. Their children were: Henry (Harry) (b. 11 May 1892), Ernest (b. 1894), Reginald (b. 1896), Nora Mary (b. 1898), Vera (b. 1901), Helen (b. 1903) and Charles (b. 1905). All the children were born in Walkeringham. In 1901 William and Annie were living at Labourers' Cottages, Marsh Lane, Walkeringham; only two children were in the home on the night of the Census, Nora (2) and Vera (under 2 months). Their three sons, Harry (8), Ernest (6) and Reginald (4) were in the house of their paternal grandparents, Henry and Mary Burden, who also lived at Labourers' Cottages, Marsh Lane. By 1911 William (49) and Annie (39) were still living at in Walkeringham. Only their six youngest children were in the household on the night of the Census: Ernest (16), Reginald (14), Nora (12), Vera (11), Helen (7) and Charles (5). Both Ernest and Reginald were at work, Ernest as a labourer at a chemical works and Reginald as a moulder's apprentice; their younger siblings were still at school. Henry, the eldest child, had joined the Royal Marine Light Infantry (Plymouth Division) on 2 January 1911. He was serving in HMS Fox when he died on 16 November 1915 and is buried in the Suez War Memorial Cemetery (formerly the British Burial Ground), Egypt. At the time of Henry's death the family was living at High Street, West Stockwith. William Burden (b. abt 1862, Kneesall, Nottinghamshire) died in 1938 aged 76. Annie (b. abt 1869, Dunham, Nottinghamshire) died in 1939 aged 70.
In 1911 he was employed as a labourer at the local chemical works. He joined the Royal Navy on 19 April 1913.
05 Jun 1916
22
2875984 - CWGC Website
K/18703
Stoker 1st Class
HMS Hampshire Royal Navy
Ernest joined the Royal Navy on 19 April 1913 on a 12 year engagement. He served in the following ships and shore establishments: HMS Victory, 19 April 1913-15 October 1913 (Stoker 2nd Class); HMS Europa, 16 October 1913-26 January 1914; HMS Hampshire, 27 January 1914-5 June 1916 (Stoker 1st Class 19 April 1914). His service record was annotated, ‘NP 4098/1916, DD. 5 June 1916 when HMS Hampshire was sunk.’ He died when HMS Hampshire was sunk by a mine in 1916; his body was not recovered for burial and his name is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial. The sunken vessel is now a protected war grave. It is interesting to note that Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, was onboard HMS Hampshire when it sank. He was travelling to Russia on a diplomatic mission when the ship struck a mine laid by the U75 U-boat off the coast of the Orkney Islands. Lord Kitchener, his staff and 643 from a ship's company of 655 perished.
2016 - A First World War Centenary Wood devised by the Woodland Trust has been planted at Kirkwall, Orkney. The copse will be planted with 746 saplings to commemorate the 737 men lost in HMS Hampshire and also the nine men lost from the drifter Lauren Crown which struck a mine after she was sent to help clear the minefield. Information on Ernest Burden has been provided courtesy of the Misterton and West Stockwith history group. Additional information (military service and family history) by T2T researcher.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph provided courtesy of The War Graves Photographic Project www.twgpp.org
    Ernest Burden - Photograph provided courtesy of The War Graves Photographic Project www.twgpp.org
  • Photograph shows Portsmouth Naval Memorial on which Ernest Burden's name is commemorated.  Photograph courtesy of CWGC.
    Ernest Burden - Photograph shows Portsmouth Naval Memorial on which Ernest Burden's name is commemorated. Photograph courtesy of CWGC.