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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
The Haslehurst family in Worksop were mostly employed in the mining industry. Charles and Sarah Ann (nee Bartrop) were married 1873 in Worksop and moved in with Sarah Ann’s widower father, John Bartrop, at 19 Eastgate, Worksop. By 1881 the couple had had 3 children. Within the next 10 years, the whole family, (including John Bartrop) had moved residence in the town to 28 Eastgate, to accommodate their growing family which included Walter Haslehurst born in 1885. In 1901, Walter started work as an iron foundry labourer whilst brother George and father, Charles worked in the local colliery. In 1910, Walter married Margaret Alice Moore from Worksop and they moved to Mexborough, Rotherham, living at 26 Garden Street. The following year they had their only child, James William. At sometime within the next few years Walter, wife and child, moved back to Worksop residing at 82 Creswell Street, Worksop.
16 Nov 1914
107678 - CWGC Website
9591
Private
1st Bn Northumberland Fusiliers
Walter was born and enlisted in Worksop. From his number, he enlisted around 1904. He may well have been a recalled reservist in 1914 as the battalion received hundreds of reservists to bring the battalion up to strength. He landed with the original draft on the morning of 14th August 1914 having left Southampton the previous day on the SS Norman. He was present at Mons, Frameries, Le Cateau, the Battle of the Aisne, Neuve Chapelle and 1st Ypres. Walter Hazlehurst was captured on 7th November 1914 when the Germans overran the battalion trenches near Herenthage Chateau just east of Hooge. He was one of nearly 130 men reported missing from the battalion on 7th November 1914 (The War Diary says 8th November). When he was captured, he had a broken right leg and a shattered right arm. He died on 16th November 1914 of his wounds and is buried at Kortrijk Communal Cemetery. Pte Walter Haslehurst Worksop Guardian 15 Jan 1915 Official information has been received in Worksop to the effect that Pte Walter Haslehurst attached to the Northumberland Fusiliers of 82 Creswell Street, Worksop, son of Mr and Mrs Charles Haslehurst 28 Eastgate, Worksop, has died as a result of a wound received in action. The statement from the War Office points out that Private Haslehurst died in a military hospital “from a fractured thigh” and had been buried. Private Haslehurst was a Reservist and immediately on the outbreak of war, he re-joined his regiment. He died a soldier’s death – a glorious death in the cause of right and justice. The deceased soldier leaves a young widow and one child to whom the greatest sympathy will be extended in their bereavement. She should remember however, Rudyard Kipling’s quotation eminently fitting just now, “Who dies if England lives, who lives if England falls”. Deceased was captain for some time of the Whitwell St. Lawrence Football Club and in the photograph we produce he is wearing the jersey of that club.
Buried at Kortrijk (St Jan) communal Cemetery. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Walter Haslehurst - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.