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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Hibaldstow, Lincolnshire
Frank Wood was born 1881 Hibaldstow, Lincolnshire to George and Louisa Wood. The couple had 8 children, Frank being the second. Ten years after Frank was born, the family were living at South Parade Ordsall, Notts where George was working as a farm labourer. In 1909, the mother to the children and wife to George, died. She was 48 years old. 1911 and all the children had left home with the exception of 17 year old Nellie who was resident with George Wood, her father, who was living at 13 Beaver Place, Worksop and working as a wood yard carter. Frank, who was now working at Manton colliery, enlisted in the army at Worksop.
09 May 1915
34
867510 - CWGC Website
15859
Private
1st Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Pte Frank Wood Worksop Guardian 18 June 1915 News has been received of the death of Pte Frank Wood of the 1st Notts and Derby Regt. S.F. who was killed in action on May 9th. Pte Wood resided with his father, Mr Wood at 26 Church Walk and was well known and much respected in Worksop. He was formerly in the service of the Great Central Railway Company and for fifteen years had been a porter at Worksop Station and later was promoted to the position of passenger guard. He then left the Company’s service for Manton Colliery, where he was employed when the war broke out. He responded to the call of recruits and since March has been in the thick of the fighting. He was able to spent Xmas at home, a fact which affords his relatives and friends some consolation. Pte Woods was a brother of Mrs Huntington, 171 Carlton Road and in a letter to her and Mr Huntington written a few days before he was killed, he says:- You say it must be awful in the trenches. Yes, it is not fun. Some of our trenches are quite close to theirs. They range from thirty yards to several hundreds, and at times they sweep our parapet with rifle fire, to say nothing of shells and bombs. They are experts at sniping, for they watch constantly on a spot, which happens to be less protected than other parts, and they seldom make a mistake: in fact, through their sniping, we have a good number of little wooden crosses erected close at the back of our trenches. Sometimes on a brook side or anywhere it is a bit safe to dig a grave, these crosses bear the name and number in pencil killed in action. They are using all kinds of illegal methods. I expect you have seen how they are using poisonous gases and inflammable liquids, and in barbarity they outdo the savages. I have seen proof of that. All these things go towards enraging our troops and if we could have our way in England would be pestered with no more German prisoners … I see you have had a scare in Worksop from aeroplanes. You should be here for thrills. We have some Worksop chaps here in this Battalion and one of them had a letter telling how you were in darkness. I don’t think you have any fear of them doing much damage in England from that source. I think you will be having some gratifying news shortly in England, as we are ready for an advance, and I fancy Allemand will smell brimstone. – I remain yours with love, Frank”. Pte Wood was 34 years of age. He was a good soldier and well liked by officers and comrades. He had died doing his duty bravely and manfully.
Commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial. His younger brother, William also died on the 20th May 1918 in France. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Frank Wood - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.