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  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian, courtesy of Robert Illett
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
In 1984 Samuel Wilson married Sarah Ann Fitzackerly in Worksop. The remainder of their lives were spent being residents in Worksop where their seven children were born, six boys and one girl. The children were, Timothy born in 1885, William in 1888, Alfred 1890, Thomas 1891, Sarah 1893, Samuel 1896 and George born 1898. In the following year, their mother died age only 38. In 1901, Samuel was bringing up his children on his own living at 27 Portland Street, By 1911 the family had decreased in size leaving Alfred, Thomas, Samuel and George all working in the collieries or timber trade. William’s absence was due to him marrying Ethel Cole in 1909 and had made their home at 11 Ryton Terrace, in Worksop. Over the next six years, before he was killed in the war, the couple had four children, Ivy, James, Florence and Ethel.
04 Jun 1917
29
150585 - CWGC Website
22611
Private
11th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Pte. W. Wilson Worksop Guardian 15 June 1917 A sad blow has befallen Mrs. Ethel Wilson, 7, Union Street, Worksop, in the loss of her husband, Pte. Wilson, Notts and Derby, Regiment, who has died in a clearing hospital from wounds received in action. Pte. Wilson, who would have been 30 in October next, enlisted in January, 1915, leaving his work at Manton in response to the then urgent call for men. He enlisted in the same Regt, as his chum, the late Pte, Walter Jepson, whose death was reported in our last issue. Pte. Wilson had seen considerable service, and came through a good many fights unscathed. His last leave home was in February, 1916. He wrote home, however, as regularly as circumstances permitted, and all his letters are written in a bright and cheerful spirit. In most of them he expressed a wish to be at home again with his wife and children, and the desire that this War would come to a victorious end. In civilian life he was a quiet man, and as a soldier he was cool, capable, and courageous. He was a worthy member of the brave and gallant band of Worksop men who have fought the good fight. The news that he had been seriously wounded was conveyed to Mrs. Wilson in a letter from the Chaplain of the Hospital, the Rev, J. O. Murray, who was writing on June 2nd, states that Pte. Wilson was brought in suffering from shell wounds in the neck and both thighs, “he asked me to write and let you know,” the letter continues, “as such wounds as these are always serious, but so far he is doing as well as can be expected. Should any change in his condition occur I will let you know. He is receiving good care and attention.” Unfortunately, Wilson was not destined to recover. On Monday, Mrs. Wilson received the following letter from the Chaplain:- “Dear Madam,- I am indeed sorry to have to follow up my letter in which I told you that your husband, Pte, W. Wilson, No 22611, was seriously wounded, by the still sadder news, that he died last night, or more accurately, in the small hours of the morning of to-day. His injuries both in the chest and legs left him small chance of recovery, though everything was done for him that could be done. He was very weak, but conscious, and not , I think, suffering very much when I saw him last, about 11 p.m. last night. I prayed with him, and he seemed perfectly quiet in his mind. He did not speak much and I understood that he died quietly-practically in a sleep. He will be buried with all due respect and military honours, and in a Cemetery near here, and I will send you the location of his grave. His private effects will be returned to you in due course. I pray that God comfort and sustain you in your sad loss. In these dark days we must only look forward to the day when ‘The shadow of death shall be turned into morning’. - With sympathy, believe me, yours sincerely, J. O. Murray, Chaplain.” Mrs Wilson and her four children will have the sympathy of her neighbours and the townspeople generally in her bereavement. By a sad coincidence her sister, Mrs. Marks, has also lost her husband, the late Pte. W. Marks, and is left with four children. Her eldest brother Pte. F. Cole, has been awarded the Military Medal, and is now in hospital in England, and two brother-in-laws, Pte. S. Wilson and Pte. A. Wilson, are in the Army.
CWG additional information:- Son of Samuel and Sarah Wilson; husband of Ethel Iddom (formerly Wilson), of 7, Union St., Worksop. Born Worksop. Buried Lussenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian, courtesy of Robert Illett
    William Wilson - Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian, courtesy of Robert Illett
  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    William Wilson - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle