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  • This photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian.
Courtesy of Robert Illett
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
George Edward Smith was born in Worksop in 1890 whilst his parents, Joseph and Harriet were living at 80 Potter Street, Worksop. As so common with young men of Worksop, George took employment in the local colliery as miner, hewer. By 1911 the family of Joseph, Harriet and George were living in 37 Lincoln Street, Worksop.
02 Dec 1915
25
454984 - CWGC Website
14046
Private
2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Pte George Edward Smith Worksop Guardian 17 December 1915 It is now beyond doubt, we are sorry to say, that Pte George Edward Smith of 37 Lincoln Street, Worksop, has filled a soldiers grave. He was among the many Worksop men from that part of the town who on the outbreak of the war left the mine for the battlefield. The news of his death is particularly sad, and came as a great shock to his parents, as on the very day as the intelligence reached them, they were making final preparations for his arrival on furlough. The gallant soldier enlisted on September 2nd 1914 in the 2nd Sherwood Foresters and was among the first of the New Army to arrive in France, which he reached in May. He enjoyed great popularity among a wide circle of friends, all of whom will unite in conveying heartfelt sympathy with relatives. Educated at the Abbey Boy’s School, he later worked for Mr Short, Bridge Street and afterwards at Manton Colliery. He was a cripple in the early part of his life and used to live in Potter Street, where he resided for a considerable time. He was hit by a bullet on December 2nd and the grief among his colleagues is expressed in the following letter to the bereaved parents from Dr G Williams:- “ Madam, It is with the deepest sympathy that I write these few lines to inform you of you son’s death. He was killed on December 2nd. He did not suffer long. He was well liked and respected by all who knew him, especially the ‘Bombers’, which party he was in up to the fatal day. I am sure we all join in our sympathy with you in your grief. He was one of our best soldiers. We are thankful to know, that he died a heroes death, fighting for King and country. If you want any more news concerning your dear son, I will be only too glad to let you know..” The officer commanding the 13th platoon, D company, M R Allen wrote:- “ please accept my deepest sympathy in the loss of your son. He was a good soldier in every way and a splendid example to his comrades, with whom he was extremely popular. He died a true soldiers death and the platoon will not forget him…” Pte Smith was an enthusiastic footballer and by his death, the platoon loses a very valuable and a typical English soldier and one who will be sorely missed. Ever cheerful in the face of any disadvantages and trials, his letters home were most optimistic.
CWG additional information:- Son of Joseph and Harriet Smith, of 37, Lincoln St., Worksop, Notts Commemorated on the Whitehouse Cemetery St Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • This photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian.
Courtesy of Robert Illett
    George Edward Smith - This photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian. Courtesy of Robert Illett
  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at White House Cemetery, St Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    George Edward Smith - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at White House Cemetery, St Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle