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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
Alfred Pennington and Sarah Ann Kelk, both of Worksop families, married in Worksop in 1889. When their first child, Dora was born, in 1891, Sarah was living with her parents on Gateford Road and Alfred was working as an assistant butcher in Attercliffe in Sheffield. Alfred must have had a later opportunity with regard to his career, as by 1901, he was a shop owner and hairdresser at 24 Gateford Road, Worksop. He and Sarah had had 5 more children, Constance 1893, George Alfred 1895, William 1897, John Reginald 1899 and Marion 1901. Sadly, Marion died when only one year old. It was their third child, George Alfred, who became another casualty of the war and whose name is inscribed on several Worksop memorials. In Worksop Retford Road cemetery stands a headstone marking the grave of Alfred, Sarah and infant Marion Pennington. Even though George Pennington was buried in France, his details and date of death are inscribed on this family memorial in remembrance of him.
18 Oct 1918
23
279241 - CWGC Website
53431
Corporal
Royal Scots Fusiliers
Corpl George A Pennington Worksop Guardian 24 January 1919 In these days of armistice when the piping peace times are within sight, when thousands of men are returning to their homes and their pre-war occupations; and when hundreds of prisoners are being released, it is particularly sad to have to announce the death of yet another Worksop soldier who had fallen on the field of honour. Some time ago, news reached Mr and Mrs J A Pennington, Gateford Road, Worksop of the reported death in action of their eldest son, Corpl George Pennington, who was a young man very well known in town. The official information of his death has now come to hand, so that Mr and Mrs Pennington have been deprived in the hope they constantly held of hearing good news of him. Corpl Pennington who was 23 years of age, was in the 11th Royal Scots Fusiliers. He joined up in March 1916, when he left the service Mr J H Dixon, chemist, Bridge Street, with whom he had but a short time to stay for the completion of his articles. He was previously with Mr J R Pennington, chemist, Bridge Street. In the army he made good headway, and after earning promotion, was many times pressed to accept a commission, but this he did not choose to do, and as a Corporal he served in France from May 1918. The circumstances of his death showed that died while performing a very important and daring duty, - to take precautions in case the enemy attempted an outflanking movement. It would seem that on October 18th, when in the front line at Toome near Lille, he was detailed to get in touch with the regiment on the right of his company. Despite heavy shelling, he reached his objective, and was bringing back the all important information to his Commanding Officer, when the enemy sent a salve of heavy shells, one of them killing the deceased. From letters received by Mr and Mrs Pennington, it would seem that the Corporal’s officer realised his splendid fighting qualities and all round efficiency. Writing to his parents, Lt. H L Pratt says:- “Your son, who was in my company and who I though a great deal of as an NCO was sent from the company to another, with three other men, and whilst with them, was sent to try and get in touch with a regiment on our right. Unfortunately, the party got into a very heavy shelled area, and I heard no more about any of them until two days later, when we had advance a good many miles. I was then informed that your son had been killed. This was a great shock to me, as he was the best NCO I had and should have been promoted at an early date. I will make further enquiries and try to find out where he was last seen, and all particulars for you … Please accept my deep sympathy in your great loss and believe me that Corpl Pennington was one I could always depend upon for any duty, yours very sincerely, H A Pratt, Lieut.” Mr and Mrs Pennington will have sincere and heartfelt sympathy of a wide circle of friends and of the townspeople generally, in their bereavement. The Corpl’s death came at a time when the whole front occupied by the British was ablaze with fire. The British were attacking at almost every sector, and it was these attacks that not only broke the back of the enemy resistance, but also finally defeated the enemy. The loss of such an NCO would have been deeply deplored at any time, but when every soldier was needed to push the attacks, and consolidation right home, it was especially regretted. But he has died in a great cause – without the efforts of men with his stamp, Britain could not have been the victors, and many of us would not be here today. The King has written to Mr and Mrs Pennington, expressing the sympathy of the Queen and himself in their loss. Lord Milner, secretary of State for War, has similarly written, and his Lordship observes that the gallant soldier died in the cause of freedom and justice. Mr and Mrs Pennington, have another son William, with the colours and although he is only 19 years of age, he has gained a commission in the Sherwood Foresters and has had many exciting and risky experiences in France.
CWG additional information:- Son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Pennington, of 9, Netherton Rd., Worksop, Notts, buried in Hem Communal Cemetery, Nord, France. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    George Alfred Pennington - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
  •  Family grave situated in Worksop (Retford Road ) cemetery commemorating the death of George Alfred Pennington. Photo taken by Peter Gillings
    George Alfred Pennington - family grave - Family grave situated in Worksop (Retford Road ) cemetery commemorating the death of George Alfred Pennington. Photo taken by Peter Gillings