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  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian.
Courtesy of Robert Illett
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
Harry Victor Stringfellow was the first born child of Frank and Ada Stringfellow. Frank married Ada Ann in 1896 in Worksop, Ada’s maiden name being Rodgers. Harry was born in 1896 in Worksop and two years later had a brother, Sydney James Stringfellow, who was also born in Worksop ion 21 Aug 1898. By 1901, the family were living at 13 Bridge Terrace where Frank was employed as a foreman at a brewery in the bottling department. Two more children were born in the next decade, Frank in 1902 and Jennie in 1908 both in Worksop. In 1911, although only 14 years old, he was working for the Great Central Railway as a clerk.
09 Apr 1917
19
262650 - CWGC Website
266703
Private
6th Bn Gordon Highlanders
Signaller Harry Victor Stringfellow Worksop Guardian 20 April 1917 “He did his duty bravely to the last minuet.” These are the words in a letter telling Mr and Mrs Frank Stringfellow, 15 Bridge Terrace, Worksop, the sad news that their son Signaller Harry Victor Stringfellow fell in battle on Easter Monday. The letter which reached Worksop on Wednesday was written by one who saw the incident, and is as follows:- It is with deep regret that I have to inform you that your son, and my best comrade, Victor, was killed in action on Easter Monday morning. I was with him at the time and was shot through the heart by a sniper, so that death was instantaneous. We were engaged in battle at the time and had reached our objective when poor Victor was killed. It must be of a little consolation for you to know that he did his duty bravely to the last minuet. He will be very much missed by all especially in the Company and signalling section, for he was so popular. He was buried in a burial ground with a number of his comrades. I assure you that you have my deepest sympathy and that of all his chums in your great loss, Yours sincerely, Leonard Schofield.” Signaller Stringfellow, who was in the 6th Gordon Highlanders, was a chum of the late Pte R Davy and it was he, it will be remembered, who wrote the sorrowful news to Mr and Mrs Davy of their son’s death. The two young heroes enlisted with several other Worksop boys in the Camerons in September 1915, and were for some time in training at Inverness, after which they went down to Ripon, where they were transferred to the Gordons. The deceased was the son of well known Worksop parents and as a boy attended the Abbey School, where he was very popular and he was also a chorister at the Priory Church. On leaving school he became associated with the G.C. Railway and worked at Shireoaks, afterwards securing a position in the offices of the Shirbaoks Colliery Co., where as an employed was a badged man. But his desire to join the Army was so great, and his parents may be proud of the fact that he enlisted voluntarily and did not hide himself behind his starred trade to escape service. Pte Stringfellow was sent out to France in July 1916, in which month he attained the age of 19 years. All his hardships and struggles he bore without a murmur, his letters home always bright and cheerful and he was ever full of confidence. His work as a signaller wanted a cool head and danger from snipers were always present. He wrote that he was safe while at his post, but the getting to it and returning was a difficult job. Pte Stringfellow’s brother, Sydney, joined the colours a few weeks ago and is now undergoing his training. The deceased was well known and highly respected by a large number in the town, who all will receive the news of his death with great sorrow. Profound sympathy will be expressed with the parents in the loss of their soldier son.
CWGC - Son of Frank and Ada Ann Stringfellow, of 50, Park St Worksop, Notts. Buried at the Highland Cemetry Roclincourt, France. Research by Colin Dannatt
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Photos

  • Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian.
Courtesy of Robert Illett
    Harry Victor Stringfellow - Photo was originally published in the Worksop Guardian. Courtesy of Robert Illett