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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
Bernard Renshaw White was born in 1898 in Worksop to Herbert and Lucy White. Before 1901, Lucy was a widow bringing up her 8 children at number 5 Crown Street. Ten years later, the family was living at 40 Devonshire street in Worksop.
05 Feb 1916
291331 - CWGC Website
46251
Private
11th Bn Leicestershire Regiment
Pte. Bernard White Worksop Guardian 15 February 1918 Another Worksop hero to make the supreme sacrifice is Pte. Bernard Renshaw White, Leicestershire’s, second son of Mrs. Herbert White, Devonshire Street, Worksop, who died on February 5th from wounds received in action the previous day. Pte. White, who was only 19, joined the forces in March, 1917, less than a year ago, and had been in France just nine weeks. He was home on leave for a few days previous to going out. The deceased was a steady lad, of a bright disposition, and well liked by his companions. He was a member of St. Mary’s (R.C. Church), and before enlisting he was a clerk with Mr. E.G. Warburton Solicitor. Much sympathy is expressed with his mother, Mrs. White, who is a widow, in the loss of her gallant son, the deceased being one of a large family. Her eldest son, Pte. Charles White, has been serving with the Sherwood Foresters for three years, and two son-in-laws are also in the army. Writing to the late soldier’s mother, the Rev. Paul J. Ratter, say’s:- “Dear Mrs White,-I regret to tell you your son Bernard died in hospital yesterday. He was admitted early in the morning, suffering from many wounds. I saw him about 3.30 a.m., and gave him the last Sacrament. He died in the evening between 4 and 5 o’clock. He did not complain much. He did not leave any messages. I said Mass for him this morning and buried him in the cemetery close by this afternoon. I offer you my sympathy in your bereavement, and I shall pray for you. P.S. Do not be surprised or pained at his not leaving any messages for you. He did not realise, I am sure, plus conditions, and could not think much”. Writing also to Mrs White, Sister A.B. McMillan says that Pte. B.R. White was brought in during the night very badly wounded and from the first we had very little hope of his recovery. He had several wounds, both arms and both legs being involved, and from loss of blood, he was in a much collapsed state. Strangely enough, in spite of all that he seemed to suffer very little pain, and we were thankful for that. I hope it will be some little consolation to you also to know that he did not suffer. He was so grateful, poor boy, for everything that was done for him. You may be rest assured that we did all in our power to save him for you. I do not think that he realised at all that he was dying. The Priest saw him several times during the day. He lingered until 10 minutes to five, and then just passed away very quietly just as if he had gone to sleep. I am glad for your sake that he died here amongst friends, and not amidst the horror of the battlefield, and I hope that will comfort you a little too. With deepest sympathy.
CWG additional information:- - Son of Mrs. Lucy White, of 40, Devonshire St., Worksop. Commemorated in Grevillers British Cemetery, France. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Bernard Renshaw White - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
  • Buried in Grevillers British Cemetery.
    Bernard Renshaw White - Buried in Grevillers British Cemetery.