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  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
There are the names of two brothers engraved on the memorials in Worksop. They are Murgatroyd and George Cooper, the youngest sons of William Armitage and Hannah Cooper (nee Neal), The Coopers had had four children, prior to the births of Murgatroyd in 1879 and George in 1883 in Worksop, two boys born in Newcastle and two girls born in Worksop. Immediately after the birth of George, his mother died in Worksop age 39 in 1883. Initially widower, William and children resided in Gateford Road, Worksop but soon moved to Park Street, which became their long term residence. William’s lifelong trade was a stone mason, Murgatroyd became a bricklayer and George started his working life as an iron grate moulder but by 1911 was working underground in Dinnington colliery at as a horse keeper.
25 Sep 1916
33
270640 - CWGC Website
13586
Private
6th Bn Leicestershire Regiment
Signaller George Cooper Worksop Guardian 24 November1916 Another Worksop man who has made the great sacrifice is signaller George Cooper, of the 7th? Leicestershires, who has died from wounds. Better known to his intimate mates as “Kid Cooper”, he resided for a number of years with his father in Park-Street, and practically spent the whole of his life up to enlistment in Worksop, being articled with Mr. A.H.Richardson, architect and surveyor. At the time war broke out, however, he was connected with the Dinnington Colliery, and he enlisted at the outbreak and soon went to France. The circumstances of his death have been communicated by his C.O. who, writing to his relatives in London, states that he received his wounds at G*ndencourt on September 24th. He was running a signalling wire out when he got struck on the head by a piece of shrapnel and severely wounded. He was taken to hospital, but died later. The C.O. continues that his death is much regretted by his comrades and officers of the Battalion, and their only consolation is that he very materially assisted in the success of the day, and added to the honour of the Battalion, and died as a British soldier should. A very fine tribute this to “Kids” memory, which will be appreciated by his many friends in Worksop. His brother, Lanc, Corpl, Cooper of the B.F. has just returned from the front on ten days leave, after being in France sixteen months, much of which period he has been in the fighting. We hope to reproduce a photograph of “Kid” next week.
CWG additional information:- Son of William Armitage Cooper and Hannah Cooper, of Worksop. Buried Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L'Abbe. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    George Cooper - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Heilly Station cemetery, Mericourt-L'Abbe Somme, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    George Cooper - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Heilly Station cemetery, Mericourt-L'Abbe Somme, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle