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  • This plaque in St Nicholas Church, Eydon commemorates 
William Ewart Martin Lewis and his brother John Theodore Mitchison Lewis, both of whom were killed in the Great War.
Person Details
Mount Sorrell Loughborough
William was born in 1899 the son of the Reverend William John Lewis and Mary Darnell Lewis, of Mountsorrel Vicarage Loughborough Leicestershire. William and Mary had five children Dorothy Mary , Patricia Helen, John Thedore Mitchison, William Ewart Martin and Cecillia. In 1901 and 1911 the family was living at St Peter's vicarage Mount Sorrell.
He attended St Cuthbert's College Sparken Hill Worksop 1913-1916
30 Mar 1918
19
1584332 - CWGC Website
197593
Gunner
Royal Horse Artillery
William was in the Officer Training Corps while at St Cuthbert's College Worksop and enlisted at Loughborough and served with in 'C' battery 16th Brigade the Royal Horse Artillery. He is commemorated on the Poziers memorial, Somme. He is further commemorated by a plaque in St Nicholas Church, Eydon, Northamptonshire (see photo) which also commemorates his brother John Theodore Mitchison Lewis who at aged 20 years was killed in action at Ypres on 1st August 1917 while serving with the Machine Guns Corps
The following is an extract from 'The Cuthbertian' July 1918 issue No 2 page 127: It was a great shock to us all to learn at the beginning of this term that William Ewart Martin Lewis was shot in Flanders, while serving his gun, on Easter Eve, March 30th. He entered the School in September, 1913, leaving in Dec.,1916. He was the son of the Vicar of Mount Sorrel. During his last term he was prefect of Chapel and Company Q.M. Sergt. in the O.T.C. It was his intention to go to Oxford in preparation for Ordination. On the first Sunday of term the Headmaster spoke of the influence on a school of the life of such a boy as Lewis. He was not in any sense of the word an athlete-a disability which he felt keenly--but he had a very strict sense of duty and of his obligations as a School Prefect and Prefect of Chapel, and set an example of unimpeachable integrity. He was as fearless of upholding what is right at School as he was afterwards in the Army, where his unostentatious practice of the Christian life, which he had learnt to live both at home and at school, proved a living witness to his comrades in arms, and in many known cases profoundly affected their manner of life. Though so young he was indeed a gallant Christian Gentleman, and, had he lived to enter the priesthood, we believe that he would have served a most useful ministry. The letter from the officer commanding his battery says,"Although he had never been under fire before March 21st, he showed a complete indifference to danger, which had he lived would have proved in valuable. All through the ten days of the battle he seemed to take everything as a matter of course, and did his job in the most quiet and normal manner. I certainly believe that he would have earned some decoration had he lived, though I imagine that he would not have valued a decoration as much as a sense of having done his duty." During his address the headmaster asked the congre­gation to stand for a moment in silent prayer, and as a token of respect
Remembered on

Photos

  • This plaque in St Nicholas Church, Eydon commemorates 
William Ewart Martin Lewis and his brother John Theodore Mitchison Lewis, both of whom were killed in the Great War.
    William Ewart Martin Lewis - This plaque in St Nicholas Church, Eydon commemorates William Ewart Martin Lewis and his brother John Theodore Mitchison Lewis, both of whom were killed in the Great War.