[Skip to content]



  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop, Notts
John Lawrie, a Scotsman from Edinburgh, was in the Royal Navy in 1861. On the 7th April his R N ship, Mars, was at anchor in Palermo Bay. It was probably whilst in the forces that he married his wife, Lucy, as their first child, Andrew, was born in Gibraltar in 1865. John Lawrie and family must have left the Royal Navy about 1867/8 as shown by the birth of Henry in London in 1867, Rosa and Annie born in Skelbrooke, Yorks, in 1868 and 1870. In 1881, they were living in Upper Hallam, Sheffield, where Herbert was born in 1877 and John had turned his hand to make his living as a coachman. They moved by 1833 as their next son, Hugh, had been born in Worksop on that date and by 1891 they were living in 62 Park Street, Worksop and where Charles Lawrie had been born there in 1888. The Lawrie’s eventually settled at 28 Ryton street in Worksop. There were two of the Lawrie’s sons who were to die in the war, Hugh, who in 1901 was working as a groom at Scofton on the Osberton estate. He married Ethel Rosella Marshall on 1st July 1905, making their home in 8 Park Place, Worksop. He later became a chauffeur prior to enlisting on the 13 Nov 1914.The other son was Herbert Lawrie. In 1891 he was employed as a plumbers apprentice He joined the army in 1900 and also married to his wife Mary with whom he had 3 children. He was discharged on 1st April 1919 and awarded a Silver war badge.
04 Sep 1915
33
602338 - CWGC Website
M2/035135
Corporal
Mounted Bde Army Service Corps
Corporal Hugh Lawrie Worksop Guardian 24 September 1915 News has been received in Worksop of the death in the Dardanelles of Corporal Hugh Lawrie, Army Service Corps, husband of Mrs Lawrie, Newcastle Avenue and forth son of Mr and Mrs John Lawrie, 28 Ryton Street, Worksop. The deceased soldier who was 34 years of age enlisted about twelve months ago and went out later to Egypt and the Dardanelles, acting as chauffeur to General Payton. The sad news was conveyed to the widow in a letter from the General who said, “They were loading wagons on September 4th ready for the next day when a stray bullet hit him through the heart, killing him instantly. There were 50 men altogether and he was not the only one hit.. Corporal Lawrie was born in Worksop and had lived here all his life. He was keenly interested and other sport was of a particular bright and cheery disposition. By the nature of his occupation he was well known and highly respected by a large number of people, Having been for twelve years in the service of Mr H Moore, veterinary surgeon and later, for several years with Messrs. Hill Bros. Carlton Road, as chauffeur. Corpl Lawrie has no family but leaves beside the widow, an aged father and mother, with whom great sympathy is expressed in their bereavement. Mr and Mrs Lawrie have another son in the Army, Sergt Herbert Lawrie, 8th Hussars who had been in India for six years previous to the outbreak of war and who is now in France. He spent a few day leave of absence with his parents at Christmas. Corpl Hugh Lawrie Worksop Guardian 1 October 1915 Further details are now in one possession concerning the death of Corpl Hugh Lawrie, Army Service Corps, husband of Mrs Lawrie of Newscastle Avenue, Woksop and fourth son of Mr and Mrs Lawrie of 28 Ryton Street, Worksop, Which was reported in our last issue together with a photograph of the deceased. The distressing news created quite a sensation in the town, for not only was Lawrie well known, but highly respected by a wice circle of friends, who will ever rember his kind and cheery disposition and his delightful optimism. The deceased soldier was 34 years of age and enlisted about 12 months ago. He went out to Egypt and later to the Dardanelles acting as chauffeur to General W E Peyton. He was a native of Worksop and was keenly interested in the sporting organisations in the town. He was killed on September 4th. They were loading wagons on September 4th ready for the next day when a stray bullet hit him through the heart, killing him instantly. There were 50 men altogether and he was not the only one hit. Great sympathy will be extended to his relatives and the only consolation in this, their hour of bitter trial, must be that he died a glorious death – a soldier’s death – and a grander death could not be imagined. Corpl Lawrie who worked for Mr H Moore for twelve years and later for Messrs. Hill Bros. Carlton Road, leaves a widow and aged father and mother, who bye the bye, have another son in the Army, Sergt Herbert Lawrie, 8th Hussars who had been in India for six years prior to the outbreak of war and who is now in France. How Corpl Lawrie was appreciated by the “powers that be”, is described in the following touching letter, received by Mrs Lawrie from General W E Peyton:- My dear Mrs Lawrie, I don’t know how to write and tell you of the sad, sad news of your husband’s death. He was shot by a stray bullet whilst loading carts in the dark. The bullet passed through his heart and he died instantaneously, without pain and without a moan. The loss to us is indescribable. He had endeared himself to every officer on the staff by his cheery willing work, never thinking of himself, but only for the comfort of the officers. It is almost impossible to understand how the bullet reached him. There were fifty men close to him and they were undercover of a hill. My brother, Mr Peyton was standing next to him. I never had a more devoted follower and for the last twelve months our lots lay very close together. Every morning at five o’clock, before others were astir, dear Lawrie would creep into my dugout with a cup of hot tea. It was a point of honour with him not to be a second late, because he knew I liked to be up and about before anyone else. I can’t describe to you what I feel and yet I know, my dear Mrs Lawrie, it will be nothing to your grief. Such a good brave man could have been nothing but a tender loving husband. My wife will send this letter on to you, and she will assist you in any way she can. My Lawer, Mr Rigden, has your husband’s instructions about his pay due. If you have any difficulty, write to Mrs Peyton who will communicate with Mr Rigden. Again my deepest sympathy. I feel I have lost a most devoted friend. I have got his kit and will see any small mementos are kept. I laid him to rest at midnight close to where he fell. A cross will mark the spot and I will send you a photo. The enclosed letter he wrote you yesterday morning, and told my servant he would post it today, Yours in great sorrow W E Peyton. “ Lawrie’s last letter home which was written on the morning of his death and which he said he would post the following day, read:- “My own darling, Just a line to let you know I am still alright …It is a bit rough, but that we don’t mind. … The thing we miss most is water. We only was and shave about once every four days. The other day when I was near the sea, young Tomkin (Bridge Street) spoke to me. He is the only Worksop lad I have seen here, except the Sherwood Rangers. Saw young Walker the other day … He is alright and looks well… The sun has been so hotthe skin is peeling off my arms … We are as brown as natives. “ Mrs Peyton, the wife of the General, writing from Collingwood Mount, Camberly, Surrey, writes:- “ Dear Mrs Lawrie, I cannot find words to tell you how my heart aches for you. The overwhelming sad news that my husband has written to me, which letters came today and which I send you. General Peyton is heart broken over it. He was so fond of Lawrie. What can it be to you, such a good man as my husband says. If the manhood of the nation was like Lawrie, England indeed would be different. One feels so powerless and helpless to give you any comfort. As again and again one thinks of the days that are gone but with him ‘all is well,’ God rest his soul. You must tell me if there is any little thing I can do to help you. I knew dear Lawrie, too, and I feel his death intensely, I cannot write more, the tears will come, Yours in deepest sorrow, Gertrude H Peyton, Sept 20th 1915.
CWG additional information:- Son of John and Lucy Lawrie, of Worksop; husband of Ethel Rosella Lawrie, of 6, Newcastle Avenue, Worksop, Notts. Commemorated in the Green Hill Cemetery, Gallipoli. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.
    Hugh Lawrie - photo originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918 in Worksop Library.